…Practical advice on finding a connection with who you are, what you're about and what a good death means to you as you grow inwardly and age outwardly.
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have the talkLink to: My Health Care Wishes Pro app – www.myhealthcarewishes.com
Link to Randy & Sandy’s Advance Care Plan: https://vimeo.com/91444621

 

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shutterstock_187897427Here’s a list offered by The Conversation Project that’s significant because it is broadcasting out there that we are working our way toward living life to its end the way we want to. But first, a statement from this great organization:

“This is not your average Buzzfeed list. No celebrities below. But nevertheless a few hats and horns are warranted because 2014 was the year when Americans finally began breaking the code of silence about end-of-life conversations. When The Conversation Project was founded, the media was full of static about “death Panels.” It was still taboo to talk about how we wanted to live at the end of life — the care we wanted, the care we didn’t want. We and many others believed it was the most important conversation America wasn’t having. It was important to change the culture, to…

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Brittany Maynard, 29, who is featured everywhere (People magazine, CNN, CBS, Compassion and Choices website) shares details of her terminal brain tumor and her choice to end her life. The physician writer Atul Gawande with his latest book Being Mortal Medicine and What Matters In The End recently appeared on Jon Stewart telling us to attend to life with meaning, a life rich and full as possible under whatever the circumstances.  These are closely on the heels of books like The Cost of Hope and Knocking on Heaven’s Door and websites such as Death over Dinner and The Conversation Project.

Since it appears we are talking more about dying could it mean that this great big taboo that makes us all not be prepared for death is coming undone? Could this be the baby boomers latest and perhaps greatest cultural movement? Is Brittany Maynard’s stance on how she choices to…

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By Diane Burnside Murdock on June 25, 2014
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IRDA stcikerIt’s more than an award! It is the realization that something I care about fiercely was heard.

A writer sends her words out into the world and never really knows what impact it has until people tell me and consumer guides like IndieReader discover me.  So thank you so much, IndieReader, for that. It’s a huge opportunity for readers to learn about my work that they might not have otherwise found.

Winners were asked a few questions to describe their books. Here’s what I said about The New Art of Dying.

photo 1What’s the book’s first line? 


There’s no doubt that how we die lives on in those who survive us.

What’s the main reason someone should really read this book?

You are gifting yourself…

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I call here Weez. Louise and I are best friends. It never mattered that nearly 30 years separate us. Weez is 93. I’m 64. She is one of those rare birds who speaks without effort about life, love, growing inwardly, aging outwardly, and dying. Listening, your face is a rictus of sheer delight and wonderment. It’s as if you’ve been fed. You are made full.

These days she is growing backwards, more like a naked baby bird. Fragile and delicate as she moves along her journey toward oneness.

I want to share a few of her verbal gems. I liken them to colleting sea glass, treasured.

About dying, “Everyone’s doing it, why not talk about it?”

It’s my first time growing old and so I haven’t had much practice,” adding, “It is pretty hard to quote yourself, when you never heard it before.”

“When people say there’s something not right about you, well, I’m…

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